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Posts tagged "Wills"

Estate planning can help address specific desires

Many Texas residents know that having a plan for potential situations can help address those events more easily. When it comes to end-of-life wishes, early estate planning could better ensure that surviving family are not left floundering when it comes to taking care of various estate-related proceedings. Creating a will can often provide useful information that allows the process of closing the estate to go more smoothly.

Estate planning goes beyond monetary value

Families often create histories, and when a loved one dies, survivors may be eager to preserve those histories. While many in Texas may focus their estate planning on larger assets such as bank accounts and real estate, some heirs are more interested in those items of sentimental value. Legal experts recommend that those preparing their wills look beyond the obvious to those items that may cause conflict between heirs.

What estate planning tools may work best for Texas residents?

When creating an estate plan, many Texas residents may not know what documents could work best for their circumstances. Because there are a variety of tools and options that could potentially be utilized, this type of confusion is understandable and not uncommon. In hopes of better narrowing down what type of estate planning methods may work best, individuals may want to assess their needs and desires.

Texas estate planning not just for after-death wishes

It is not unusual for individuals to consider their estate plan as a manner to express wishes for what should take place after their deaths. However, estate planning can also prove immensely useful for parties who are still alive. Because incapacitation and long-term care needs are a reality for numerous people, having plans in place to address those concerns may be beneficial.

Estate planning provides personal preference and peace of mind

In one's financial affairs and in life, there are two basic ways of doing things: organized and disorganized. Being organized in Texas and elsewhere is a good thing that results generally in success, whereas doing things in a disorganized manner, or not doing them at all, can cause financial and personal disarray. With respect to estate planning, an individual definitely wants to be organized to avoid disaster and to leave one's family and loved ones with smooth sailing after his or her death.

Estate planning works best when shared with family members

Family members may find it interesting to discuss financial issues, but generally that does not carry over to freely discussing topics of inheritance and estate planning. That is a mistake that families in Texas and elsewhere should correct wherever possible. Having open and detailed discussions about financial status and estate planning for the inevitable events of the future can be an emotional relief for all concerned.

Putting off estate planning can lead to disputes and expenses

A recent study by an international wealth management company concludes that as family dynamics become more complex, the potential for conflicts after a family member's death increases. The survey took a national sampling, which presumably included Texas. The report states that only 28 percent of those responding said that their parents had shared their estate planning details with them.

Estate planning is best done with experienced professional help

Estate planning in Texas and elsewhere is always an important legal process that one should take seriously. In that light, it is not something to experiment with by adopting online offerings or selected snippets of information that do not consider the full range of legal and factual issues pertaining to the individual or married couple. Estate planning is a process that is best done in conjunction with an experienced estate planning attorney.

Wills are useful for young couples and those of modest means

Many people in Texas and elsewhere have the misconception that because they are young they do not need a will. Young parents, however, may greatly benefit from having in their wills the designation of who should take care of their children if they have both died. The fact that this does not happen often does not dismiss the need and wisdom to prepare for such an event.

A simple will and power of attorney can avoid numerous problems

Many Americans, including in Texas, are not certain how their estate should be divided after death, per a 2016 Gallup survey. Well over half of all Americans also do not have a simple will. Going without a will may raise complications for persons who are single without children, unmarried couples living together, or even married couples without kids.

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