Estate Administration and Probate Archives

Must the executor of a will provide a copy of the inventory?

Most people do not keep their lives neat and tidy. Because there are so many ups and downs throughout anyone's life, it can be difficult to keep everything as organized as possible. As a result, it is important that the executor of a will does an inventory of assets remaining in an estate for his or her own sake and to provide to the court.

Probate can become complicated if a beneficiary dies

Closing an estate can be complicated for any number of reasons. Some Texas residents may think that the probate process is going relatively smoothly only to be blindsided by an unexpected event. For example, beneficiaries may be working to handle the distribution of a particular asset when one of the beneficiaries passes away.

Starting probate can already take a lot of work

Many Texas residents do not understand how to close a deceased individual's estate until they are in the position of starting the process themselves. Acting as the executor of an estate is a complicated role, and most people who take on the position are not professionals. Fortunately, executors can have help throughout probate and can look into how to begin the process effectively.

Beneficiaries can contribute to probate delays

Though most Texas residents feel a great deal of grief after the death of a loved one, they often also want to receive any inheritances they are entitled to as quickly as possible. Of course, most estates need to go through probate, and it is not unusual for the process to take a considerable amount of time. Certain factors can also contribute to the process taking even longer.

It's easier to distribute property with TOD accounts

Settling a recently deceased individual's final affairs can be a difficult job for the executor of the Texas estate. Though the executor has many obligations to address during probate, other loved ones may simply be concerned with when he or she will distribute property from the remaining estate. Though this action does take place during probate proceedings, some accounts do not have to go through the process in order to be distributed.

How much compensation can the executor of a will receive?

Settling the Texas estate of a recently deceased person is not an easy task. The executor of a will has the obligation of making sure that all the necessary steps are taken to close the estate correctly and of handling the individual's final affairs. Even when cases are straightforward, they can take time and effort. In some cases, disputes could take place that make the situation even more difficult.

The executor of a will has many duties to address

Before a person can close a loved one's Texas estate, the probate process needs to begin. The executor of a will needs to take the appropriate steps to get the legal proceedings underway so that the estate's final affairs can be settled. However, beginning the process takes many steps itself.

Probate issues can arise if appointed parties do not seek help

In a best case scenario, a deceased loved one will have created a comprehensive estate plan to indicate his or her wishes to a surviving Texas family. While this plan can help individuals understand what steps to take to settle affairs and complete probate, it may also mean that that several people will need to step into important roles. While these individuals can be helpful, conflict can sometimes also arise.

Dealing with parent's debt during probate may cause confusion

The death of a parent can have a major impact on surviving children of any age. While emotional struggles can impact those of any age, adult children may also have other responsibilities to attend to when it comes to closing their parents' estates. While working through the Texas probate process, they may find themselves concerned over their parents' remaining debts.

Probate does not have to be an intimidating process

Many life events can sometimes come marked with a legal process. When Texas residents experience the death of a loved one, that person's estate may need to go through the legal process known as probate. Though this procedure is relatively common, many people may not understand why it is necessary or what occurs during the proceedings.

Contact Kolb & Murray, P.C., at 830-386-4801 to schedule your initial consultation with an experienced law firm devoted to serving you, your family and your business.

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