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Wills

2 signs you could be dealing with a fraudulent will

Sometimes a will turns out to be fraudulent. As you probably know, a fraudulent will cannot be enforced. Rather, a will that is deemed fraudulent may be challenged by the interested parties. Here are some of the red lights that may be indicative of a fraudulent will....

2 steps that cause estate problems

A will makes it easier for people to disperse their estate to their family and loved ones after they pass away. People usually write wills during their life at some time or another. This legal document may only be a few pages, but every detail matters – in more ways...

Where to store your will for safekeeping

Have you done the responsible thing as an adult and created a will? If so, that’s a great first step in ensuring that your wishes will be carried out once you pass.  However, along with creating a will, you also must figure out where to keep it. After all, you need to...

Do you need a will if you don’t have kids?

If you don't have any heirs in Texas, you might be tempted to forget about writing a will and let the state decide what to do with your assets. However, there's a lot of ways to use your assets even if you don't have a spouse or children. If you don't plan ahead, you...

What happens if your will is out of date?

If you live in Texas and already have an estate plan or you are creating one, you might wonder whether your will goes out of date at some point in the future. The good news is that wills do not have an "expiration date." The bad news is that for other reasons, an...

Who is considered an interested party?

When an individual dies in Texas, certain people have the right to contest the individual's will. They might launch a will contest if they suspect that the individual was forced or influenced to write the will a certain way. However, only people who are "interested...

A child doesn’t have to be included in a will

If you fail to create an estate plan, Texas law may dictate that a portion of your assets go to your children. However, there is no statutory requirement to include a son or daughter in a will. Let's take a look at what you should know if you don't plan on providing...

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